Beyond Science

7 BIGGEST Underwater Mysteries We Still Don’t Understand

japan-mystery-underwater-pyrimids-article-size1
Written by JayWill7497

japan-mystery-underwater-pyrimids-article-size1

From an underwater stonehenge to a picture of a mastadon on a rock to magnetic anomolies in a strange lake, these are the 7 biggest underwater mysteries will still don’t understand.

Narration provided by JaM Advertising New Mexico www.tasteofjam.com

Ivan Terence Sanderson was a Scottish biologist who first coined the term “Vile Vortex” to describe areas of unusual phenomena unusual phenomena around the world. He claimed there were twelve such areas, and barring the few on land in Asia, Africa and Antarctica; most of these areas can be found out at sea, with the most famous being – the Bermuda Triangle.




Right now the only people playing “hide the sub” should be Jared from Subway’s cellmates, but in 1968 someone or something caused not one, not two, but four submarines to randomly disappear around the world.

Stonehenge is one of the most famous historical monuments in the world, but it is far from the only random arrangement of old-timey stones humanity has uncovered. We’ve seen similar sites across Europe, Asia, Africa and America, but none of these were ever discovered underwater.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration constantly monitor the ocean for unique sounds emanating from the ocean. They pick up all sorts of strange and weird noises every day, yet whilst most can be explained, the origin of some has never been determined.




With a name like that you know this thing isn’t gonna be small. Leptocephalus Giganteus is an eel species of which only two have ever been observed, and on both occasions they were undeveloped larvae. The first sighting was in 1930 off the coast of South Africa, when Danish scientist Anton Brunn captured a 6ft specimen. He recognised it as the larvae of a Leptocephalus, who are typically around one thirtieth of the adult’s size, which means if fully matured it could have grown to over 180ft.

There are countless examples of marine biologists estimating the size of an ocean dwelling creature only to encounter one far larger than anyone thought possible. One such event occurred in Japan’s Suruga Bay, where Japanese scientists detected a huge 30ft shark, leading some to wonder whether the prehistoric Megalodon, which measured up to 59 feet, could still be lurking somewhere at the bottom of the ocean today.

Southern Siberia’s Lake Baikal is the largest freshwater lake in the world, and not only is it incredibly ancient, clocking in at 25-30 million years old, but the lake and surrounding area also contains a rich biodiversity of over 1000 plant species and 2500 animal species, of which 80% exist nowhere else in the world.




Feel free to leave a comment. We would like to know what you think.




About the author

JayWill7497

Reporter, Journalist, Blogger, Researcher. Committed to providing information by posting/archiving videos, articles, and links. I also investigate to raise awareness on numerous issues, inspire critical thinking, involvement, and hopefully to help make our world a better place for all. “The truth, always the truth at all costs”

%d bloggers like this: